Monday Night Movies 2017-18: Origins

35mm film series at the Waterville Opera House

Sponsored by Colby Cinema Studies and the Center for the Arts and Humanities

Tickets: $10 / Free for students with I.D.
Series Pass: $55 (admits one to all screenings)

HIGH AND LOW

Akira Kurosawa, 1963.
October 23, 2017, 7:00 p.m.
Sponsored by Colby Department of East Asian Studies

Toshiro Mifune is unforgettable as Kingo Gondo, a wealthy industrialist whose family becomes the target of a cold-blooded kidnapper in HIGH AND LOW, the highly influential domestic drama and police procedural from director Akira Kurosawa. Adapting Ed McBain’s detective novel King’s Ransom, Kurosawa’s film moves effortlessly from compelling race-against-time thriller to exacting social commentary, creating an unforgettable, widescreen black-and-white thriller that’s much more—in fact, some consider it the Japanese master’s greatest film. 1963. Unrated. In Japanese with English subtitles. 143 Min.
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RED DESERT

Michelangelo Antonioni, 1964.
November 13, 2017, 7:00 p.m.
Sponsored by Colby Department of French and Italian
Michelangelo Antonioni’s 1960s panoramas of contemporary alienation were decade-defining artistic events, and RED DESERT, his first color film, is perhaps his most epochal. This provocative look at the spiritual desolation of the technological age—about a disaffected woman, brilliantly portrayed by Antonioni muse Monica Vitti, wandering through a bleak industrial landscape beset by power plants and environmental toxins, and tentatively flirting with her husband’s coworker, played by Richard Harris—continues to keep viewers spellbound. With one startling, painterly composition after another—of abandoned fishing cottages, electrical towers, looming docked ships—RED DESERT creates a nearly apocalyptic image of its time, and confirms Antonioni as cinema’s preeminent poet of the modern age. 1964. Unrated. In Italian with English subtitles. 117 Min.
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MON ONCLE

Jacques Tati, 1958.
December 18, 2017, 7:00 p.m.
Sponsored by Colby Department of French and Italian

Visual wit, Gallic charm and smart slapstick prevail again when Jacques Tati’s eccentric, old-fashioned hero, Monsieur Hulot, is set loose in Villa Arpel, the geometric, oppressively ultramodern home of his brother-in-law, and in the antiseptic plastic hose factory where he gets a job. The second Hulot movie and Tati’s first color film, MON ONCLE is a supremely amusing satire of mechanized living and consumer society, in some ways seeming a contemporary update of Chaplin’s MODERN TIMES. It earned the director an Academy Award for best foreign-language film. 1958. Unrated. 116 Min.
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MULHOLLAND DRIVE

David Lynch, 2001.
January 15, 2018, 7:00 p.m.
Sponsored by SBS Carbon Copy
A love story in the city of dreams . . . Blonde Betty Elms (Naomi Watts) has only just arrived in Hollywood to become a movie star when she meets an enigmatic brunette with amnesia (Laura Harring). Meanwhile, as the two set off to solve the second woman’s identity, filmmaker Adam Kesher (Justin Theroux) runs into ominous trouble while casting his latest project. David Lynch’s seductive and scary vision of Los Angeles’s dream factory is one of the true masterpieces of the new millennium, a tale of love, jealousy, and revenge like no other. 2001. R. 146 Min.
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CHILDREN OF PARADISE

Marcel Carné, 1945.
February 19, 2018, 6:30 p.m.
Sponsored by Colby Department of French and Italian

Poetic realism reached sublime heights with CHILDREN OF PARADISE, widely considered one of the greatest French films of all time. This nimble depiction of nineteenth-century Paris’s theatrical demimonde, filmed during World War II, follows a mysterious woman (Arletty) loved by four different men (all based on historical figures): an actor, a criminal, a count, and, most poignantly, a mime (Jean-Louis Barrault, in a longing-suffused performance for the ages). With sensitivity and dramatic élan, director Marcel Carné and screenwriter Jacques Prévert resurrect a world teeming with hucksters and aristocrats, thieves and courtesans, pimps and seers. And thanks to a major new restoration, this iconic classic looks and sounds richer and more detailed than ever. 1945. Unrated. In French with English subtitles. 190 Min.
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PICKPOCKET

Robert Bresson, 1959.
March 19, 2018, 7:00 p.m.
Sponsored by Colby Department of French and Italian

This incomparable story of crime and redemption from the French master Robert Bresson follows Michel, a young pickpocket who spends his days working the streets, subway cars, and train stations of Paris. As his compulsive pursuit of the thrill of stealing grows, however, so does his fear that his luck is about to run out. A cornerstone of the career of this most economical and profoundly spiritual of filmmakers, PICKPOCKET is an elegantly crafted, tautly choreographed study of humanity in all its mischief and grace, the work of a director at the height of his powers. 1959. Unrated. In French with English subtitles. 76 Min.
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WR: MYSTERIES OF THE ORGANISM

Dušan Makavejev, 1971.
April 16, 2018, 7:00 p.m.
Perhaps the most unique (partially) made-in-Maine movie ever produced.
What does the energy harnessed through orgasm have to do with the state of communist Yugoslavia circa 1971? Only counterculture filmmaker extraordinaire Dušan Makavejev has the answers (or the questions). His surreal documentary-fiction collision WR: MYSTERIES OF THE ORGANISM begins as an investigation into the life and work of controversial psychologist and philosopher Wilhelm Reich, centering on his “Orgone accumulator” and work in Rangeley, Maine in the 1950s, and then explodes into a free-form narrative of a beautiful young Slavic woman’s sexual liberation. Banned upon its release in the director’s homeland, the art-house smash WR is both whimsical and bold in its blending of politics and sexuality. 1971. Unrated but not for younger audiences. In English, and in Serbo-Croatian with English subtitles. 85 Min.
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